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LAUNCH

Posted On 03 May 2024
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This entry is part 4 of 30 in the series AusMotorcyclist Issue#29

Stuart is wearing a Shark Explore-R helmet, Held Carese II jacket, Held Backfl ip gloves, Held Torno II pants and Sidi Way Mega Rain boots.

TRIUMPH TIGER XRX
MORE ROAD-IE, THAN DIRT-Y WORDS STUART WOODBURY PHOTOS JEFF CROW

THE TIGER XRX… IS THE BIKE THAT 85% OF “ADVENTURE” RIDERS SHOULD BE BUYING

When we rode this bike, there were four Tiger 800s: the XC, XCx, XR and XRx. Now there are six, but more of that in a future issue.

Last month in MOTORCYCLIST we reviewed the Triumph Tiger XCx – one of the dirt-biased Tiger 800 family members. This XRx has many of the features of the XCx, but with more of a road focus. It is the bike that 85% of “adventure” riders should be buying.

For the Australian launch we rode from Melbourne along The Great Ocean Road to Apollo Bay, with a detour up around Lavers Hill. On the return trip we took some back roads and hit the dirt for a while. It was a good all-round kind of trip to show off the versatility of the new XRx.

The Tiger XCx and XRx share a lot of their “extra” features (that’s what the little “x” means) over the standard XC and XR models, like the enhanced instrument panel, Road and Off-road riding modes, configurable Rider mode, auto cancel indicators, cruise control, centre stand,hand guards, adjustable screen and an additional 12V power socket.

The XRx differs from the XCx with the Comfort seats for the rider and pillion, a smaller 19 inch front wheel (versus the 21 inch wheel on the XCx) and by being 5kg lighter. This gives the XRx more agility on the road but you do get much shorter wheel travel. However, in terms of “average” motorcycle wheel travel, the XRx still has plenty on offer.

180mm in the front and 170mm in the rear give the bike a plush ride over the many crappy roads we have.

Visually, the XRx has a short nose and alloy wheels, as against the XCx’s long “enduro” type snout and wire wheels.

The suspension fitted to the XRx matches that of the XCx – WP front and rear. Damping is nice and this setup with the 19 inch front wheel makes for a nice mid-sized touring motorcycle capable of some dirt road work. On the bitumen you have a motorcycle that handles nicely with light turn in and in the dirt it will handle most roads, just not with the extra stability of the XCx’s 21 inch front wheel.

The rider’s seat is height adjustable – 810 to 830mm, with a low seat option available as well. For my long legs I found the 810mm height a little low in the seat to peg height, but was quite happy with the higher 830mm setting.

Comfort is excellent, especially with the standard Comfort seats.

The bike I rode throughout the launch had the accessory bar riser fitted, which was great for standing up while in the dirt, but sitting down I preferred the standard setting.

When I tested the XCx model, I was quite fussy with the way I had the Rider modes set up, but on the more “relaxed” XRx I only used the preset Road and Off-Road modes. And, most of the time I left the bike in Road mode in the dirt, too. It was only when we hit some rougher sections that I switched over, wanting a bit less ABS interaction.

The XRx has received a bit of a trim compared to the previous model. The radiator shroud and tank side panels have been sharpened up, with the redesigned radiator shrouds quite effectively channelling hot air away from your legs.

So what type of rider would buy the XRx over the XCx? I would say most of you should look at the XRx, unless you are the type of rider who’s really going to hit the dirt more frequently than most and wants the extra strength the wire wheels offer over rough terrain and the occasional jump.

Take both the XRx and the XCx for a ride before making your final decision and really think about the choice, not just on what you might think has to be “the look”. Either bike should keep you happy.

SPECS

TRIUMPH TIGER 800 XRX

PRICE: $16,590 (plus on-road charges)
WARRANTY: Two years,unlimited distance
SERVICING INTERVALS: Every 10,000km or 12 months
ENGINE: Liquid-cooled in-line three cylinder, 4-stroke, DOHC, 4 valves per cylinder
BORE x STROKE: 74.05 x 61.94mm
DISPLACEMENT: 800cc
COMPRESSION: 12.0:1
POWER: 70kW @ 9250rpm
TORQUE: 79Nm @ 7850rpm
TRANSMISSION: 6-speed, wet multi plate clutch, chain final drive
SUSPENSION: Front, 43mm inverted fork, adjustable preload and rebound, travel 180mm. Rear, monoshock, adjustable preload and rebound, travel 170mm.
DIMENSIONS: Seat height 810-830mm,weight 216kg (wet), fuel capacity 19 litres, wheelbase 1530mm
TYRES: Front, 100/90/19. Rear, 150/70/R17
FRAME: Tubular steel
BRAKES: Front, twin 308mm discs with dual-piston switchable ABS calipers. Rear, 255mm disc, single-piston switchable ABS caliper.
FUEL CONSUMPTION: N/A
THEORETICAL RANGE: N/A
COLOURS: Crystal White, Phantom Black, Caspian Blue
VERDICT: ROAD AND DIRT, NOT DIRT AND ROAD

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Australian Motorcyclist Magazine is Australia's leading motorcycle travel magazine.
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